Genetics

“Genetics is one of the most far-reaching of the sciences with its potential to alleviate human suffering.”

Peter Gruber, Chairman Emeritus and Co-Founder
The Gruber Foundation

The Genetics Prize is presented to a leading scientist, or up to three, in recognition of groundbreaking contributions to any realm of genetics research.

The Gruber Foundation established and awarded its first Genetics Prize in 2001. This year of monumental accomplishment in genetics research, with the successful sequencing of the human genome, was a particularly auspicious time to launch the world’s first major international prize devoted specifically to achievements in the realm of genetics research.

Created 135 years after Gregor Mendel discovered laws of heredity that implied the existence of genetic factors, the Genetics Prize is awarded under the guidance of an international advisory board of distinguished genetics scientists.

Beginning in 2001, the Prize – a gold medal and unrestricted $500,000 cash award – has been awarded for fundamental insights in the field of genetics. These may include original discoveries in genetic function, regulation, transmission, and variation, as well as in genomic organization.

Bonnie Bassler made pioneering discoveries on bacterial communication 

Bert Vogelstein discovered new genetics pathways and processes contributing to cancer